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$50M One-Time CTE Enhancement Funds

These are questions we've received from stakeholders across the state regarding the $50M one-time CTE Enhancement funds. As we evolve this process, new questions and answers will be noted with the posting date (and revised date if applicable) and listed in reverse date order so that you can easily find the newest Q & A's at the top.

Q: Can Career Technical Education Enhancement Funds may be used as match in your 2015-16 EWD (SB1402) Grant Renewals? (posted 05/05/15)

A: Grantees cannot claim as match from one funding source to obtain additional funding for another grant from that same fund source. CTE Enhancement Funds are from the EWD section of the budget bill. Therefore, CTE EF cannot be used as match for grant renewals funded from EWD funds.

Q: Can colleges charge indirectly for project coordination or management, particularly for the 40% Regional Share? (posted 11/25/14)

A: Colleges cannot charge indirectly and CTE Enhancement Funds cannot be used to fund on-going operational costs. It is, however, permissible to fund personnel for one-time expenditures such as curriculum development, professional development, and direct project management costs when they are "necessary to develop, enhance, retool, and expand quality career technical education offerings.”

Q: What is the scope of work for the Fiscal Agent? (posted 8/10/14; revised 9/8/14; revised 10/10/14;; revised 11/19/14)

A: Please see this final scope of work for the Fiscal Agents - as of 11/19/14.

Q: What if we are using the money toward a multi-purpose lab?  Should we only list 1 TOP code (the 1 that has the greatest LMI need) or list all programs affected by the multi-purpose lab? (posted 11/17/14)

A: Please list the TOP codes that will most benefit from this expenditure, listing the TOP code that will most gain first. The CTE Enhancement Fund Local Share application only allows for 5 TOP codes. Take the top 5 if you have more.

Q: What if they predict 100 graduates, but there is only 6, will they have to pay back the money, and who is checking to see that the goals were met? (posted 11/17/14)

A: The primary purpose of asking colleges to predict the number of additional graduates is to enable colleges investing in expanded capacity in the same labor market to gauge whether collectively there is a risk of oversupplying the market. There is no requirement that colleges use the funds to expand programs but, if there is a labor market gap, the college is encouraged to help close that gap.

Q: Will the 40% allocation go through the college’s district or straight to the college? (posted 11/17/14)

A: The CCCCO will only contract through the districts and the districts have the responsibility to allocate out. The Regional Consortia will determine the 40% Regional Share funding distribution.

Q: The projects proposed need to have a regional coordinator. Who is going to pay for the indirect personal to host this position? (posted 11/17/14)

A: The CTE Enhancement Fund does not provide for indirect cost recovery for the subgrantee colleges.

Q: We cannot meet the January 9th deadline. Can we have more time? (posted 11/17/14)

A: The timeline was intended solely as a projection and the region has local decision-making authority to adjust it. All funds must be spent by March 15, 2016.

Q: What does the 40% application look like?  What is the criteria? Can we have a sample form like we did for the 60%? (posted 11/17/14)

A: A version is under development and our intent is to release it by December 1.

Q: Can we use funds for outreach/marketing to strengthen our pathways? (posted 10/21/14)

A: The ultimate goal of these investments is to: 1) increase job placements of our graduates within labor markets where there is a current gap between demand and supply and 2) increase the capacity of colleges to work together to meet regional scale labor market gaps. If marketing helps to achieve these goals and meets the criteria cited in the budget law, then it would be allowable.

Q: We can use funds for professional development. Does this include paying for a portion of someone’s master degree program since a MS will be required to teach in this discipline by 2020? (posted 10/21/14)

A: The ultimate goal of these investments is to: 1) increase job placements within labor markets where there is a current gap between demand and supply and 2) increase the capacity of colleges to meet regional scale labor market gaps. Professional development would have to address both goals and meet the criteria cited in the budget law, clearly demonstrating a benefit to increased regional alignment serving more than one individual’s or one college’s interests.

Q: Can CTE Enhancement funds be used to remodel/renovate space in a current building to enhance and expand our auto program? We would like to begin offering courses in alternative fuels and have maxed out our current auto program space. The space we are considering using for this new program is in the same building as the rest of the auto program. The auto program has some of the equipment necessary for the alternative fuels program but is in desperate need of a dedicated space for this program enhancement which would result in program expansion. Would this request be considered an allowable expense in the “other related costs necessary to develop, enhance, retool and expand quality CTE offerings” category? (posted 10/21/14)

A: The ultimate goal of these investments is to: 1) increase job placements within labor markets where there is a current gap between demand and supply and 2) increase the capacity of colleges to meet regional scale labor market gaps. Yes, if the proposed facilities’ improvement is in agreement with these ultimate goals and they meet the real property guidelines in CCCCO Article II, then they would be allowable as an “other related cost,” as it appears to meet these budget law criteria and would be one-time costs related to program implementation.

Q: What is the allocation method for the $50M CTE Enhancement Fund? (posted 10/10/2014)

A: The $50M CTE Enhancement Fund is being distributed based on actuals and use 3 variables:  FTES, CTE FTES, and the # of colleges.

60% of the funds are designated as Local Shares calculated based on those 3 variables. Colleges can rely on those dollars as long as they adhere to the budget language.

The remaining 40% (called Regional Shares) must be accessed through multi-college applications. This was intended to incentivize coordination across colleges for the betterment of students. Again, budget language specifies how those dollars can be used and accessed.

The above method of administration was derived through 14 regional listening sessions with the field.

Q: Do we, the Consortium, not do the secondary certification until Dec. 2-19? So we do not review until final app? (posted 10/10/2014)

A: The Regional Consortia will review the Local Share initial app of every college in its region at the CCCAOE the week of October 20-24. It will then review the final app (which may change based on RC facilitation at CCCAOE and other venues) and issue secondary certs by Dec 19 after the Local Share final app is due December 1. RCs will stagger working with their Fiscal Agent (FA) for CTE EF to then start issuing subgrants or subcontracts through January 31, 2015, depending on whether the FA's district governing board's schedule is biweekly or monthly.

Q: During the Oct-Nov period, how do colleges see each other's initial apps? Do we, the Consortium, put a spread sheet on our website? (posted 10/10/2014)

A: Yes, the RCs will have viewing rights to each college’s initial and final Local Share app, which they will aggregate by TOP code in an Excel extraction (which we can help you with) and then post to the RC website to provide regional transparency during the process.

Q: Can a college submit a proposal for a state-funded noncredit short-term vocational program as part of their CTE Enhancement Fund application? (posted 10/10/2014)

A: Because these are not ongoing funds (but rather one-time), you cannot spend the funds on ongoing or fixed costs. Thus, you cannot use the funds to support the direct costs of instruction, but you can fund curriculum and professional development, equipment, and other one-time related costs. So, provided the program met the required budget law criteria (listed below), you could build or enhance a non-credit program, but you cannot fund the instruction. Ongoing instruction would be expected to be funded from the Prop 98 apportionment generated by the student contact hours.

The required budget criteria every program must meet are:
(A) Be for occupations and sectors that are demonstrated to be in demand in the regional labor market.
(B) Be for occupations for which regional production of employees is insufficient to meet labor market demand.
(C) Demonstrate regional alignment of program and curricula.

Q: Do we, the regional consortium, approve the 60% applications as meeting the requirements stated in the budget bill and thus locally need a process to do so? (posted 8/14/14; revised 9/8/2014)

A: CCCCO has simplified the process thanks to feedback from the listening sessions:

  • September-Early November 2014:  Once the CCCCO releases the online application and the breakdown of Local Shares, colleges are to submit an expenditure plan outlining its use of its Local Share. This application will include a self-certification that funds will be used in adherence to the Budget Law.
  • November-December 2014:  The Regional Consortia will convene a regional discussion focused on potential duplications/gaps, especially in the priority and emergent sectors of the region. Prior to this convening, the Fiscal Agent will post a report of all proposed expenditures by all colleges across the region sorted by TOP code to give a consolidated regional view. Based on the proceedings, colleges are invited to modify or stay with their application. Colleges must secure secondary certification of their final applications.
  • January 2015:  Final applications are then processed for payment by the Fiscal Agent in consultation and collaboration with their Regional Consortia.

Q: What is the Scope of Work for the Regional Consortia in processing the $50M CTE Enhancement Funds in partnership with the Fiscal Agent? (posted 8/14/14; revised 9/8/2014)

A: The Regional Consortia (RCs) have the following responsibilities in carrying out their designated role in the implementation of the CTE Enhancement Fund:

  1. Coordinate with the TAPs Labor-Market Research Centers of Excellence and the Deputy Sector Navigators for their region to provide the region’s colleges with labor market information to guide colleges’ application.  Applications should build the region’s capacity to meet regional workforce development needs and comply with the guidelines of the CTE Enhancement Fund.
  2. Facilitate outreach to regional employers and essential workforce and economic development partners to identify regional workforce development needs and opportunities for colleges to partner in meeting those needs.
  3. Facilitate communication, coordination and collaboration between colleges in region serving similar industry sectors and occupations to build the region’s capacity for meeting regional workforce development needs.
  4. Convene a regional discussion focused on potential duplications/gaps of Local Share applications in their respective region, especially in the priority and emergent sectors. Prior to this convening, the Fiscal Agent will post a report of all proposed expenditures by all colleges across the region sorted by TOP code to give a consolidated regional view. Based on the proceedings, colleges are invited to modify or stay with their application. The colleges will then seek Regional Consortia secondary certification of their final application. Final applications for Local Share will be processed by the region’s Fiscal Agent, in consultation and collaboration with their Regional Consortia, for payment as subgrants or subcontracts in January, 2015.
  5. Develop a process to evaluate the Regional Share applications for their region. If there is over subscription to the available Regional Share, the Regional Consortia may rank those applications considering criteria in accordance with the budget language and award to those applications with higher rank order.
  6. Anticipate in the Regional Share process that there will be multi-college applications from a single region and some from multi-regions. In the case of a multi-region application, should it receive certification by the respective Regional Consortia affected, a college can only draw down funds from its own Regional Share. Final applications are then processed for payment by the region’s Fiscal Agent.

Q: What is the definition of industry match or what constitutes industry match? (posted 8/26/14)

A: All contributions, including cash and third party in-kind, shall be accepted as part of the recipient's cost sharing or matching when such contributions meet all of the following criteria:

  • Be related to private sector or not-for-profit community support identifiable to the project or program;
  • Directly benefit and be specifically identifiable to the project or program;
  • Be necessary or reasonable for proper and efficient accomplishment of project or program objectives;
  • Be verifiable by grant recipient's records; and
  • Be allowable under standard cost principles as defined by federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-21 and A-110.

The following contributions shall NOT be accepted as part of the recipient's cost sharing or matching contributions:

  • The cash or in-kind source is matching two different projects/programs/grants;
  • Cash, goods or services from non-industry sources, including the college;
  • Cash, goods, or services expended/used prior to July 1, 2014;
  • Cash, goods, or services expended after the grant program has ended; and
  • Cash, goods or services that are not allowable under standard cost principles as defined by OMB Circular A-21 and A-110.

Q: What are examples of industry match? (posted 8/26/14)

A: The legislature sees match as an indicator of industry commitment to the program and/or its graduates. The following are examples of possible cash and non-cash match that be quantified to show the depth of commitment by employers to a program. This is not an exhaustive list.

  • Cash contributions, including scholarships, stipends, and internship wages.
  • Donation of time by professional and technical personnel, consultants and other skilled and unskilled labor.
  • Service on industry advisory committees.
  • Donated, loaned or leased space, buildings, or equipment.
  • Donated, loaned or leased supplies such as equipment, office supplies, laboratory supplies or workshop and classroom supplies.

Q: Can an application select an industry sector that is beyond the 10 priority and emergent sectors identified by the Chancellor’s Office? (posted 8/26/14)

A: The legislation gives minimum requirements as well as the prioritization of investment dollars. Projects that are beyond the 10 priority and emergent sectors chosen by your region are allowable but should be accompanied by strong evidence that they meet the minimum requirements and especially that they merit priority. In the event the Regional Shares are oversubscribed, the Regional Consortia need this evidence for its deliberation.

Q: What is the role of the TAPs for Labor-Market Research Centers of Excellence (CoE)? (posted 8/14/14)

A: The CoEs have the following responsibilities:

  1. Coordinate with the Regional Consortia and Deputy Sector Navigators for their region to provide the region’s colleges with labor market information to guide colleges’ efforts to apply for the Local Share CTE Enhancement Funds. This data should assist the college to self-certify their efforts, build the region’s capacity to meet regional workforce development needs, and comply with the guidelines of the CTE Enhancement Fund.
  2. Assist the Regional Consortia for their region to prioritize award grants for the Regional Share CTE Enhancement Funds multi-college and multi-region applications according to the budget requirements if the funds are oversubscribed.

Q: Are Local Shares reverting to the region and vice versa still? (posted 8/14/14)

A: No, the listening sessions have advised us to simplify this process. There will be no reversions between Local and Regional Shares. Local Shares stay local, and have until March 15, 2016 to be spent. Regional Shares stay regional, and have until March 15, 2016 to be spent. Unspent funds as of March 15, 2016, will go back to the CCCCO. The Fiscal Agent Scope of Work will be updated to reflect these changes and reposted to the website.

Q: Do we still have to encumber by June 2015? (posted 8/14/14)

A: No, Local Shares and Regional Shares have until March 15, 2016 to be spent. We encourage the field to put their funds to use as soon as possible.

Q: For the 40% applications, does each consortium need to develop a process to approve applications? (posted 8/14/14)

A: Yes, each Regional Consortia needs to develop a process to prioritize and certify which applications will receive funds from the Regional Share. Regional Consortia should anticipate that there will be multi-college applications from a single region and some from multi-regions. In the case of a multi-region application, should it receive certification by the respective Regional Consortia affected, a college can only draw down funds from its own Regional Share.

Q: If one college does bulk buying for a group of colleges, does it retain liability for maintenance and insurance on all equipment purchased? (posted 8/6/14)

A: No, upon transfer of the asset to the resident college, the resident college also assumes the responsibility for maintenance, insurance and whatever costs are associated with ownership of that equipment.

Q: What happened to the requirement that CTE Enhancement funds had to be encumbered by June 30, 2015? (posted 8/6/14)

A: The state requires the CCCCO to encumber the CTE Enhancement monies to the Fiscal Agent by June 30, 2015. CCCCO plans to accomplish this requirement by December 31, 2014. Regions are in the process of finalizing their Fiscal Agent recommendations and, once these Fiscal Agents are Board of Governors’ approved, CCCCO will move funds to the Fiscal Agent, thereby completing the encumbrance process and statutory requirement.

Q: Are both the 60% Local Share and 40% Regional funds noncompetitive? (posted 7/25/14)

A: The calculation of the 60% Local Share made available to a college will be devised by formula according to actuals. Colleges can access their Local Share in a noncompetitive manner by adhering to budget language requirements according to the timeline. The 40% Regional Share is not necessarily competitive. Each Regional Consortia will establish a decision-making process, and should the funds be oversubscribed, can include ranking applications according to criteria or the competing funds. Budget language requirements must be met.

Q: For the Career Technical Education Enhancement Fund, funds may be used for equipment, curriculum development, professional development, and other related costs necessary to develop, enhance, retool, and expand quality career technical education offerings. What constitutes “other related costs”? (posted 7/25/14)

A: Examine all the expenses necessary to develop, enhance, retool, and expand quality career technical education offerings and divide them between one-time vs on-going/recurring. Because this is one-time funds, on-going/recurring expenses should not be funded by these dollars. Recurring expenses like regular faculty salary should not be charged to this fund. However, if the faculty needs to attend one-time training to learn how to run the new equipment, then the one-time cost of a backfill and the one-time training registration cost is permissible. Additionally, there may be one-time equipment-related costs to install a new piece of equipment, such as the one-time rewiring of the electricity in order to handle the required new load. This item on the list would be indeed be an allowable “other related cost.”

Q: Is it ok for CTE EF applications to not have their match verification complete upon submitting but will have in order to get cost reimbursement? (posted 7/25/14)

A: Yes, most applications will not have their match in hand at the time of submission but in order to be reimbursed, must verify the match as complete prior to end of the grant term (no later than June 30, 2016).

Q: Does the industry match have to be on a one-to-one basis? (posted 7/25/14)

A: Industry match is a proxy of whether a training is truly employer-driven. Therefore, any industry match should be related to the program that is the subject of the funds.

The Department of Finance has clarified that the $50M CTE Enhancement Fund is not subject to the 1: 1 match by industry. The CCCCO has the ability to establish the level of match which it has yet to determine. Industry match will be a consideration especially if the 40% Regional Funds are oversubscribed.

Q: May the Regional Consortia select a different Fiscal Agent to handle the Career Technical Education Enhancement Fund than the Fiscal Agent handling their consortia grant? (posted 7/25/14)

A: Yes, each Regional Consortia may affirm or change the Fiscal Agent for this funding. That Fiscal Agent may be the same or a different Fiscal Agent than administering the Regional Consortia’s grant under the Doing What Matters for Jobs and the Economy framework, provided that the district selected as Fiscal Agent is situated within the region, accepts the full scope of work, and is approved by the CCCCO.

Q: To receive reimbursement funding under the 40% Regional Share, what information from applications does the Regional Consortia certify? (posted 7/25/14)

A: The Regional Consortia will certify applications for the 40% Regional Share where the courses or programs of study for which funds are requested meet ALL these criteria:

(A) Be for occupations and sectors that are demonstrated to be in demand in the regional labor market.
(B) Be for occupations for which regional production of employees is insufficient to meet labor market demand.
(C) Demonstrate regional alignment of program and curricula.

Additionally, priority will be given to programs that meet one or more of the following criteria:

(A) Are in priority sectors identified by the region.
(B) Are in emerging sectors identified by the region.
(C) Are articulated with K-12 or four year institutions.

Level of industry-match (in-kind or cash related to the course/program that is the subject of the application) will be a consideration, especially if there are more applications than funds.

Q: Can non-credit programs apply for the $50M CTE Enhancement Fund? (posted 7/25/14)

A: CDCP non-credit is about 3% of the system’s FTES. Yes, CDCP non-credit programs can access these funds as long as budget language criteria is met.

Q: With the 60/40 split, does the region need to stay with its five priority and emergent sectors? Once the 60% Local Share gets to the college, are they able to spend it on any CTE programs? (posted 7/25/14)

A: The funds, whether the 60% Local Share or the 40% Regional Share, must be spent according to budget language. The 40% Regional Share is intended to encourage capacity in the region’s priority and emergent sectors. For the 60% Local Share, CTE courses/programs on a campus in the region’s priority and emergent sectors should receive priority consideration before locally-designated sectors. Regardless, labor market data would need to evidence the reason for investment. Even if there is unused Local Share at a campus, these funds cannot be applied against uses that do not meet the three minimum criteria outlined in budget language.

Q: Will there be a common application throughout the state? (posted 7/25/14)

A: Yes, there will be an online application hosted by CCCCO that is common statewide. This online application is not anticipated to be available earlier than September.


The Opportunity
For community colleges to become essential catalysts to California’s economic recovery and jobs creation at the local, regional and state levels.

The Strategy
Doing What MATTERS for jobs and the economy is a four-pronged framework to respond to the call of our nation, state, and regions to close the skills gap. The four prongs are:

  • Give Priority for Jobs and the Economy
  • Make Room for Jobs and the Economy
  • Promote Student Success
  • Innovate for Jobs and the Economy
California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office